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Since we know how important at-home-entertainment is for all of us – every week we do a little “what’s getting released on DVD/on demand/Netflix this week” round up for you, with nice little excerpts of our past reviews and more. You’ll love it. Trust us.

OUT THIS WEEK & WORTH YOUR TIME:

  • Lights Out. Here’s what we said in our original review:
    The first time saw the trailer for Lights Out I was psyched out of my goddamn mind. Not only would it be the second horror movie to come out this summer that was backed by James Wan (who is, at this point, my one true love), but it also looked scary as hell. I’ve been obsessed with horror movies for years, so at this point it’s difficult to really put me at ease, but this one actually seemed terrifying. While I can tell you right now Lights Out’s scares are no where near as frightening as I thought they would be (and the plot is… deeply weird), there is something seriously fun about the film. It’s like the kind of horror film I would find on FearNet back in the day, but with way better production values.

  • Captain Fantastic. Here’s what we said in our original review:
    As someone who grew up in western Washington State with five siblings, I could tell you that Captain Fantastic does not represent the normal childhood experience in a large Pacific Northwest family. But you don’t need my first-hand account. This is a film wherein children become adults by killing deer with knives, an eight-year-old knows more about Noam Chomsky than soda, and “interesting” is a banished word but “fuck” is not. Anyone will be able to tell quite quickly that Captain Fantastic is an atypical movie about an atypical family. The fact that it’s also very good helps to make it a welcome departure from the norm.

  • Hell of High Water. Here’s what we said in our original review:
    Bank robbers are irresistible. From The Great Train Robbery through Bonnie and Clyde, films have romanticized those who steal from wealthy, faceless institutions. Most bank robbers do not an agenda beyond getting rich and getting away with it. Hell or High Water, however, has something else on its mind. Directed by David Mackenzie and written by Taylor Sheridan, this a thriller about downtrodden heroes who know exactly why they feel abandoned. The rich script has surprising depth: it includes hard-boiled dialogue, and has room for comedy and even some curiosity about human behavior. The strong performances anchor the film, adding emotional resonance to a story that uses suspense to make a larger point about basic dignity.

INSTANT VIEWING OF THE WEEK:

  • Babies (now on Netflix). Here’s Dan Kois over at The Village Voice:
    Babies babies babies babies babies babies, babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies Babies, babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies. Babies, babies babies babies babies babies, babies, babies babies, babies babies, babies babies babies babies babies babies babies, babies babies babies babies Babies-babies babies. Babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies Babies. Babies babies babies babies babies, babies babies Babies. Babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies, babies babies Babies. Babies babies babies babies babies babies babies, babies babies babies Babies, babies, babies, babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies babies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N009QUWUy7I

  • Creed (now on Amazon Prime). Here’s what we said in our original review:
    All that said, the dialogue, the two main performances by Jordan and Stallone, and Coogler’s creative, fleet-footed direction are all exquisite. The script never goes in for cant or cheap emotional tugs, and the nostalgia service – while present, particularly when it comes to the score by Ludwig Goransson – is subtle and unobtrusive. Jordan, always a solid actor, plays Donnie as upstanding and self-possessed, his simmering anger and self-doubt usually kept under strict control. There’s also a good deal of youthful enthusiasm: one of Creed’s best moments is when Donnie and Rocky decide to accept the match, and Donnie literally shouts out, “I’m fighting Ricky Conlan!”

  • Being Charlie (now on Netflix). Here’s Mike D’Angelo over at The AV Club:
    Being Charlie’s teenaged title character hails from a world of extreme privilege. His father, David Wells (Cary Elwes), is a former A-list movie star, famous for his pirate adventures, who’s now running for governor of California—sort of a bizarre cross between Johnny Depp and Arnold Schwarzenegger (though the pirate bit is likely a nod to Elwes’ role in The Princess Bride). Charlie, too, has showbiz aspirations—he’s done some open-mic performances as a stand-up comic—but there’s a slight hitch: He’s an unrepentant junkie who keeps fleeing the expensive rehab centers where his dad parks him. The movie was co-written (with Matt Elisofon) by one Nick Reiner, who’s all of 22 years old, and it’s loosely autobiographical, based on his own experiences in rehab… and on his battles with his own famous father, who directed it. Perhaps because of that personal connection, Being Charlie is Rob Reiner’s best film in at least two decades—admittedly a low bar to clear, given the competition (which includes such forgotten piffle as Alex & Emma and Rumor Has It…), but even a modest Meathead comeback is more than welcome.

That’s it! Get streaming this holiday weekend, nerds.

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