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Since we know how important at-home-entertainment is for all of us – every week we do a little “what’s getting released on DVD/on demand/Netflix this week” round up for you, with nice little excerpts of our past reviews and more. You’ll love it. Trust us.

OUT THIS WEEK & WORTH YOUR TIME:

  • Brooklyn. Here’s what we said in our original review:
    Few films are like Brooklyn nowadays, and that is because they are difficult to make. Director John Crowley and screenwriter Nick Hornby take a delicate melodrama – it is about a young Irish woman in the 1950s who moves to the United States – and somehow strike the perfect note for every single scene. In the wrong hands, the material would be saccharine, like a cloying Nicholas Sparks adaptation. Some moments are funny, others are tragic, and it takes a heart of stone not to be moved by its pitch-perfect conclusion.
  • Sisters. Here’s what we said in our original review:
    A comedy dream team is as easy to recognize as it is hard to come by. In 2004, Amy Poehler joined Tina Fey at Saturday Night Live’s Weekend Update desk, and it’s been clear to audiences ever since that the two longtime friends are a comedy partnership powerhouse. But their collaboration has been most effective when they’re playing themselves (Weekend Update, hosting the Golden Globes, joint interviews, paying homage to one another in their respective books), so their new feature film Sisters is a bit of a gamble, even aside from the fact that it has a little competition at theaters this weekend. Luckily, the film is strong enough that even while it leans heavily on Fey and Poehler’s chemistry, it has virtue beyond their mere presence.

INSTANT VIEWING OF THE WEEK:

  • Maggie (now on Amazon Prime). Here’s what we said in our original review:
    Upon first glance, the zombie drama Maggie is different from its genre counterparts. Arnold Schwarzenegger has the lead role, yet director Henry Hobson’s feature debut has a somber core, without any action or big-scale scares. Still, the best zombie fiction is more character-driven nowadays (e.g. The Walking Dead television and videogame series, the Colson Whitehead novel Zone One). Once the novelty of Maggie’s tone and Schwarzenegger’s straight man performance loses its appeal, the film spins its wheels as a maudlin love story. There is some intrigue, particularly in terms of world-building, except Hobson does not have resolve the material requires.
  • Look Who’s Back (now on Netflix). Here’s Boyd van Hoeij over at The Hollywood Reporter:
    Adolf Hitler is alive, well and hoping to make Germany great — again — in Look Who’s Back (Er ist wieder da), the new film from German iconoclast director David Wnendt (Wetlands, Combat Girls). A huge hit in Deutschland, this is a loose and somewhat disjointed adaptation of the best-seller by Timur Vermes, with both scripted scenes as well as Borat-style confrontations between “the real Hitler” (played by Italo-German thespian Oliver Masucci) and unsuspecting passers-by in various German cities, many of whom prefer to take selfies with Herr Hitler rather than take offense.
  • Ukraine Is Not a Brothel. Here’s yours truly over at The Washington City Paper:
    Sex sells, even in the world of feminist outrage, and the Ukrainian protest collective FEMEN arouses its audience before they think. Its members—mostly young, beautiful women—protest topless with slogans on their bodies. Directed by Australian Kitty Green,Ukraine Is Not a Brothelis the sort of documentary with a proverbial ace up its sleeve. After the obligatory public nudity, the doc provides a snapshot of key FEMEN members, all of whom speak eloquently about their goals and frustrations with the organization. But Green shifts gears toward the end of the film: The FEMEN members speak about the mysterious “Victor,” who turns out to be a manipulative leader of the group, one who’s described as a necessary evil. The irony of a man leading a feminist collective is not lost on Green or the FEMEN members, and Ukraine Is Not a Brothel ends up as a searing exposé of Victor’s domineering tactics.

That’s it for this week! Get watching, nerds.

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