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With FotoWeek kicking off this weekend with 150+ (mostly free and open to public) events and exhibitions (do you have your tickets to our opening party on Friday yet? It the one fundraiser the festival is doing) we decided to replace Videos of the Day with Photographs of The Day in an effort to highlight some of the amazing work on show at this year’s 10th annual citywide festival.

Today: a photograph by Thomas Hoepker on show as part of  MAGNUM’s 70 at 70 exhibition at FotoWeekCentral

About the photo:  Ali was and is the greatest. A great sportsman, he was a controversial thinker that enthralled people but also offended many in and outside of the ring.

Thomas Hoepker had the opportunity to spend time with Cassius Clay aka Muhammad Ali and take photographs in 1960 when he won a gold medal at the Rome Olympics. In 1966, when Ali was world heavyweight champion already; then again in 1970, when he, after several years of a forced absence from the ring, restarted his career and prepared himself for the ‘Fight of the Century’ against Joe Frazier; and years later, already weakened by Parkinson’s disease.

Many of these pictures have gone around the world and have become photographic icons. They have been shown in many museums and are sought after by collectors. Many photographs in this book have been unpublished until now. They show Ali in private moments and public appearances outside of the ring. Images show him on a visit to his hometown, talking to children and young people, flirting with a pretty baker’s daughter (later his wife), on the film set of The Dirty Dozen, in the gym and at home.

About the exhibition: An exhibition of 70 photographic icons celebrating the diversity of the Magnum Photos agency and how its photographers have born witness to major events of the last 70 years. Including seminal works by Susan Meiselas, Paolo Pellegrin, Martin Parr, and Christopher Anderson, the exhibition spans the globe and covers regional events such as Arab Spring, South Africa under apartheid, and the recent migration crisis.

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