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Savion Glover
Thursday 08/27
Savion Glover @ The Howard Theatre
$35 / $40
Famous tap dancer, choreographer, and actor Savion Glover is the epitome of a living legend. Born in 1973, the tapping marvel has graced the stage since childhood. He set a record as the youngest person ever to receive a scholarship in the Newark Community School of the Arts. Before he was a teenager, Savion made his mark starring in the leading role in the Broadway musical The Tap Dance Kid. Savion Glover developed his own dancing style he dubbed "free style hard core." The Tony Award winning dancer has starring roles in major motion pictures like "Tap" (with Gregory Hines & Sammy Davis Jr.), "Happy Feet", "Happy Feet 2" & Spike Lee’s “BAMBOOZLED”. He also starred alongside Gregory Hines in "Jelly's Last Jam", a role for which he made history as the youngest ever recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant. As a choreographer, Glover's work has helped maintain tap dancing as an art form in the modern dance world. His starring role in the musical Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk, which he also choreographed, debuted on Broadway in 1996. The musical chronicles events in African-American history and brought Savion a Tony for best choreographer. Glover was made known to the younger generation with recurring appearances on "Sesame Street." He also holds the credit as the live captured dancing motion behind Mumble the penguin in the Disney film "Happy Feet." Savion also served as co-choreographer for the film. Glover's quick steps and amazing rhythms continue to influence the lives of young people. His production company tours schools across the country, spreading enthusiasm for tap dancing and cementing his place in history.
Lalah Hathaway
Saturday 09/26
Lalah Hathaway @ The Howard Theatre
$52.50 / $60
An instrument embodied, timbre unmatched with words that call our most internal emotion… Lalah Hathaway’s presence is never mistaken nor forgotten. Skilled to the highest order, Hathaway’s voice possesses both power and vulnerability with a quiet resonance that fills spaces of grandeur and the hearts of many. “Lalah Hathaway is, quite simply put, the truth.” (Diriye Osman, Huffington Post) Born into musical legacy, the offspring of musicians Donny Hathaway and Eulaulah Hathaway, Lalah Hathaway’s career was never a choice: “I was always a musician” Hathaway clarifies, “there was never a moment of maybe I’ll be…” Preparations for the release of Hathaway’s debut self-titled album were firmly in motion during her final semester at Berklee College of Music, where the Chicago-native nurtured her multi-instrumental and songwriting talents. Since inception, Hathaway’s musical journey has remained devoted to education and musicianship. “I never wanted to be known as just a singer. I always wanted to be a well-rounded musician, with my voice as my primary instrument.” Proof of Hathaway’s musical prowess is evident in her work, operating as performer, musician, writer and producer. Revered by some of the greatest musicians of the last century, a myriad of collaborations and international performances signpost Hathaway’s 25-year success. A true bridge between masters of the Jazz and Soul traditions and new generations of Popular Music innovators, Lalah Hathaway has performed with greats such as Stevie Wonder, Anita Baker, Prince, Mary J. Blige, Metropole Orkest, Esperanza Spalding, David Foster, Snoop Dogg, Natalie Cole, Robert Glasper Experiment, Terri Lyne Carrington, Marcus Miller, Dianne Reeves, Dizzy Gillespie, David Sanborn, Rachelle Ferrell, Take 6, The Winans, Me'Shell NdegeOcello, Kirk Whalum, Donald Lawrence, Snarky Puppy, Christian McBride and many more. Enamoured with colour, space and the evolution of music, Hathaway’s six studio albums chronicle an emotive journey through R&B, Jazz, and Soul. The inflections of Blues, Funk, Gospel, Classical, Country, Rock and Folk cited in her work, are a reflection of this virtuoso’s versatility. With the 2014 Grammy win for Best R&B Performance fresh in mind, Hathaway describes how her career continues to rejuvenate with new beginnings and possibilities. “Throughout my career there have been points where new recognition or opportunity has emerged that inspires me in new ways.” Underscored by singing three notes at one time (a chord), the Grammy-winning performance of Hathaway’s 1991 single “Something,” recreated with Jazz collective Snarky Puppy, affirms Hathaway’s timeless relevance and documents the vast breadth of her vocal capabilities. Lalah Hathaway is, in every sense, a live performer. 2015 will bring the release of Lalah Hathaway LIVE, Hathaway’s first ever live album. Supported by her international fans and peers, Lalah Hathaway LIVE is a result of a successful internet-based crowd-funding campaign. “I wanted to make an album for the fans and with the fans. My fans constantly relay to me how the music they love on my records is taken to a whole new level when they experience it live.” Evident in her online presence and strong interaction with social media, Hathaway’s engaging, comedic personality is embraced by her fans, both new and longstanding. “The listeners are a huge part of my live performance and I want their presence to be captured and acknowledged on this album.” Whether live, recorded, televised or online, Lalah Hathaway’s incomparable skill, talent, musicianship and presence are recognised by artists and fans the world over. Like her father before her, Lalah Hathaway stands as music quality personified, optimum in every way.
Daley
Saturday 10/10
Daley @ The Howard Theatre
$20 / $25
Behind the signature black frames and hair, lies and honesty and truth of voice increasingly rare in todays musical landscape – it is for this reason Daley has continued to rise on his journey to becoming budding future-soul prodigy. At 24-years-old, the UK singer-songwriter is well on his way to redefining the way heartfelt music and songwriting looks, sounds and feels. “I want my music to feel of it’s time,” the young artist divulges as perhaps the most telling description of his work. “I sometimes refer to it as ‘future-throwback-soul’… everything I write is very much rooted in a feeling, the kind you get from throwback R&B and Soul that I grew up around… then sonically I try to take that and bring it a into the future.” Growing up in Manchester, England, with little around to stimulate his talent, Daley spent time taking in the greats of yesterday and today, nurtured by US and UK sounds growing up, from the all-encompassing musical stylings of Prince and soulful swagger of D’Angelo and Soul II Soul to sparse experimental sonics of Sade, RadioHead and Imogen Heap, he amalgamated a unique sound of his own. Developing his style and pen as a teen through bedroom recordings, which later found there way into the world as he moved away from home and began making a name for himself on London’s underground urban music stages. “It was tough fitting into a Manchester scene, there wasn’t a great deal of musical variety there at the time and I never felt there was a place for me. So I spent a lot of time by myself and in London, exploring how I wanted to sound and what I was capable of.’ He first perked mainstream ears writing the Gorillaz 2010 chart hit, ‘Doncamatic’ after a mutual friend introduced Gorillaz creator Damon Albarn to his music at one of his early London shows. First radio plays on BBC Radio 1 and 1Xtra plus guest spots writing, featuring and touring with UK artists including Wretch 32, Emeli Sande and Jessie J – eventually paved way for Daley’s first solo project, the independently released ‘Those Who Wait’ mixtape. The body of work took on a life of it’s own, garnering over 150,000 downloads worldwide, and spreading his music internationally – fuelled purely by word-of-mouth. “Those Who Wait was a project I put out for free. I wanted my voice to be heard without constraints, to really show people who I am and what I’m about, away from the features I’d done.’ The mixtape continued to generate viral online acclaim, with songs such as title track ‘Those Who Wait’, ‘Smoking Gun’ and ‘Alone Together’ resonating across the Atlantic – eventually securing him a major label deal at Universal Republic Records in 2012. His first official release the ‘Alone Together’ EP came shortly after, furthering his rise with Stateside single, new-classic R&B jam ‘Alone Together’ featuring Grammy nominated former Floetry songstress Marsha Ambrosius. It became a Top 5 Urban radio hit – which New York R&B station WBLS gave its first spins. The US debut EP also garnered Daley ‘Best Newcomer’ nominations from BET, Centric, Soul Train Awards and the MOBOs, made him one of BBC 1Xtra’s most shared acts to date, and has racked up over 16 million YouTube/VEVO views with live performances and music videos, including Jessie J assisted duet, ‘Remember Me’. After touring with the likes of Miguel, Emeli Sande, Gorillaz and label mate Jessie J, Daley has gone on to sell out his own tours all over the UK, Europe and the USA, expanding his audience and picking up fans from the likes of, Maxwell and Jill Scott, to Will.i.am and Pharrell Williams along the way. Part of Daley’s international appeal comes from his ability to combine universally understood sentiments and lyrics, with a sounds that fuses both yesterday and tomorrow. Connected and delivered with the technologies of today, his online following has grown into a solid, loyal foundation of music lovers of all ages. All signs point to a an eagerly anticipated full-length debut from the artist in 2014. Entitled ‘Days & Nights,’ the album balances the young star’s songwriting flair and awe-worthy vocal ability with illuminating vulnerability and substance. “Days & Nights became a diary of sorts for me. I’ve been able to say things on this album that I haven’t even talked about with my closest friends, feelings I’ve only really been able to express through music. When writing I often found myself split, one part of me writing in an optimistic, hopeful, loving perspective, the other describing a much darker, despairing side of my soul.’ he describes. ‘I wanted to identify those ‘light and dark’ elements that balance out and make us human.’ While his palette is rooted in the classics, he pushes the music forward with a futuristic intent. “It’s always soulful at the core, but the sound and production reflects the world the way I hear it – that’s what I find most exiting about making music,” he details. 

Songs like ‘Time Travel’ transcend to another dimension, with building layered vocals and drum intensity. On “Be,” he employs a warmer approach, loving sentiment and warm piano chords run through ambient, spaced-out production reminiscent of Sade. “Blame The World’ and ‘Broken’ both highlight Daley’s ability to lead vocally over triumphant brass and orchestral backing, while a delicate interpretation of Joan Armatrading’s ‘Love & Affection’ sets him akin to the likes of an Adele, with a beautiful ballad. Pharrell’s production on “Look Up” even manages to capture an essence of Maryn Gaye, without ever falling into Motown-era cliches. Past and present have rarely combined so seamlessly… Daley welcomes the world into his ‘Days & Nights’ without compromise.
Los Lobos
Sunday 09/06
Los Lobos @ The Hamilton Live
Free
Tickets: $48.00 - $55.00 Louie Perez- Drums, Guitars, Percussion, Vocals Steve Berlin- Saxophone, Percussion, Flute, Midsax, Harmonica, Melodica Cesar Rosas- Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin Conrad Lozano- Bass, Guitarron, Vocals David Hidalgo- Vocals, Guitar, Accordion, Percussion, Bass, Keyboards, Melodica, Drums, Violin, Banjo Enrique "Bugs" Gonzalez - Drums/Percussion Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy Award winning band (Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded their major label debut How Will The Wolf Survive? in 1984. Although the album’s name and title song were inspired by a National Geographic article about real life wolves in the wild, the band—David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin—saw parallels with their struggle to gain mainstream rock success while maintaining their Mexican roots. Perez, the band’s drummer, once called their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music “the soundtrack of the barrio.” Three decades, two more Grammys, a worldwide smash single (“La Bamba”) and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well -- and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in that garage in 1973. The band chronicles a key moment of their expansive journey on Disconnected In New York City, a dynamic live album that marks the band’s 40th anniversary and launches their new association with 429 Records. Recorded over two nights in December 2012 at The City Winery in NYC, the engaging 12-song set celebrates Los Lobos’ great legacy as a freewheeling and unpredictable live band, which most recently includes touring in Europe with Neil Young and Crazy Horse in June 2013. Disconnected in New York City features fresh interpretations of songs from throughout their three decade recording career, including their first ever live recording of “La Bamba,” their worldwide pop crossover hit from the 1987 film which reached #1 on the U.S. and UK singles chart and whose video won a 1988 MTV Music Video Award. The collection covers the band’s 25 year studio discography, from “Gotta Let You Know” (a bouncy zydeco rocker driven by Hidalgo’s accordion from How Will The Wolf Survive?) through “Tin Can Trust,” a bluesy rock ballad that was the title cut from their last studio release in 2010. By design, Disconnected in New York City has songs that have been longtime staples of Los Lobos’ tours mixed with other gems that had somehow fallen by the wayside over the years. The mix includes the mid-tempo shuffling rocker title track from The Neighborhood (1990); the easy flowing and whimsical (thanks to Berlin’s jazzy sax solo) “Oh Yeah” (from This Time, 1999); the spirited, traditional flavored, Rosas penned Spanish language “Chuco’s Cumbia” (from The Town and the City, 2006); the graceful and spiritual “Tears of God” (from By The Light of the Moon, 1987); “La Venganza de Los Pelados,” a fiery burst of Latin rock fusion with mariachi textures (from The Ride, 2004); the soulful, simmering blues of “Little Things” (from The Town and The City, 2006); the Latin blues funk classic “Set Me Free Rosa Lee” (from By The Light of the Moon); and two mid tempo funk pop/rock tunes from 2002’s Good Morning Aztlan, “Maria Christina” and “Malaque.” As per the literal meaning of its title, Disconnected In New York City sets itself apart from Los Lobos’ other acclaimed live recordings (most notably, 2005’s Live At the Fillmore) by stripping down the instrumentation for a mostly acoustic affair. Lozano, who drives the grooves with his bass and also plays the deep-bodied Mexican 6-string acoustic bass called the guitarron, says, “It’s funny because when the venue hired us, they specifically requested that we do something acoustic to fit its smaller dinner house vibe. The idea popped into our heads to ask them if we could record it and they were cool with that. “We’re well known for our electric, high energy performances but we’ve done acoustic stuff for certain smaller auditorium tours,” he says. “Playing these songs acoustically makes them feel more intimate. We notice that when you play softer and quieter, the audience tends to pay attention to everything we’re doing. When you play rock, they’re thinking more about rhythm than melodies and lyrics, but playing them this way allows for more subtle elements of the songs to stand out.” Perez laughs when he calls the Los Lobos Unplugged experience “folk music for the hearing impaired - it’s still loud because the acoustic instruments are amplified! The idea of making a record like this came from never having the opportunity to work some of our favorite songs from over the years into our usual sets. Because most tours are done in support of new albums, the fresh material we play means that some favorite older tunes fall away over time. When we thought about making another live album and what would make it different, the logical concept was to revisit songs we haven’t played in a while but had been requested by a lot of fans. We had already documented our rock show with Fillmore, so we felt kind of liberated to take another approach with this one. “There are two challenges releasing a live album, though,” Perez continues. “One is choosing certain songs over other ones. It’s like having kids. We love Tommy as much as Johnny but one day Johnny gets to go the park today and Johnny stays home. In spite of this, we do cover a lot of ground. The biggest problem is the way people sometimes perceive live albums, like they’re an afterthought put out to fill some kind of gap. Bands love doing them but fans don’t always pay attention. But historically, it can be a license for great creativity. Jimi Hendrix did Band of Gypsies to fulfill his last recording commitment, but it was one of the most incredible recordings he ever made. Because Disconnected in New York City marks a key anniversary and the start of us working with a new label, we put a lot of thought into the project, from its design and structure and how we performed the songs.” Steve Berlin is Los Lobos’ saxophonist, flutist and harmonica player who met the band while still with seminal L.A. rockers The Blasters. He joined the group after performing on and co-producing (with T-Bone Burnett) their breakthrough 1983 EP …And A Time To Dance. Though he wasn’t jamming with the others way back in the “Krypton days” (as Perez calls it) in the barrio garage, Berlin felt it was important to find a special way to mark his cohorts’ 40th year--just as they had done on their 30th by inviting special guests (Dave Alvin, Bobby Womack, Elvis Costello, Mavis Staples) to be part of their 2004 date The Ride. “Trying to figure out a way to acknowledge 40 years as a band is harder than you might think,” he says. “We got to play with all of our heroes on our 30th so what was something we had not done? So, like Louie said, we thought the best thing was to bring back songs we rarely if ever play and put them into a fresh context. We wanted to create something of value for our fans that would reflect the mutual appreciation we share with them – starting, of course, with ‘La Bamba,’ which we had never documented live before. I think it was important also that once we knew the set lists for the shows that we would eventually choose the final tracking from, we didn’t over-think the arrangements. We only rehearsed these shows for a single day. The coolest part of how Disconnected worked out is that we hadn’t been doing some of these songs long enough to worry about how to pull them off. And because we performed them acoustically, we couldn’t just blast everyone with power and skate through them. We had to be present and make the choices that occurred to us in each moment.” Around the time of their last big anniversary Rolling Stone magazine summed up that distinctive, diverse and spontaneous Los Lobos aesthetic perfectly: “This is what happens when five guys create a magical sound, then stick together for 30 years to see how far it can take them.” Most fans know that the group came together from three separate units. Hidalgo, the band’s lead vocalist/guitarist (whose arsenal includes accordion, percussion, bass, keyboards, melodic, drums, violin and banjo) met Perez at Garfield High in East LA and started a garage band. Rosas, who plays guitar and mandolin, had his own group, and Lozano launched a power trio. “But we all hung out because we were friends and making music was just the natural progression of things,” says Perez. “Like if you hang around a barbershop long enough, you’re going to get a haircut.” Looking back at the historical and cultural sweep of the band, Lozano sees the release of Disconnected In New York City as Los Lobos coming full circle. “A lot of people forget that though we were rock musicians when we got out of high school, the band started off as an acoustic outfit,” he says. “We wanted to play Mexican folk music because those were our roots and there was this whole Chicano awareness thing happening back in the early 70s. We started to pay attention to our traditions and culture, and focused on those styles of music for years. We studied music from every region of Mexico, learned how to play all these authentic instruments. So that’s what we did for ten years until we decided to play rock again by bringing in drum and electric bass. “We were playing this restaurant gig for two years, and some small local clubs, playing the same songs, when people in the crowd started shouting out, ‘Do you know any Beatles or Grateful Dead tunes?’” Lozano adds. “Soon we got fired from the restaurant and headed back to the garage to write our first original songs that were rock with some accordion on them: ‘Let’s Say Goodnight’ and ‘How Much Can I Do?’ We made a little tape and gave it to the guys in The Blasters, which included Steve Berlin, when we went to see them live on Sunset Strip. They loved our tunes and invited us to open their show at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go, which was the first time Los Lobos performed on the other side of the Los Angeles River. We played some originals and old favorites by Hendrix, Cream, The Yardbirds and Beatles – all the stuff we loved as kids. The icing on the cake is that the audience loved it, too.”