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An Acoustic Evening With Parachute
Thursday 07/09
An Acoustic Evening With Parachute @ The Hamilton Live
$20 / $30
For the members of Mercury Records group Parachute, the name of their third album, Overnight, could well be a sly commentary on the hard work and commitment it's taken for them to experience the success that's been building over the last four years and first two albums. Their 2009 debut Losing Sleep featured the Top 15 single, "She is Love" (boasting more than 6.5 million views), while 2011's The Way It Was included the #1 iTunes Rock Song "Kiss Me Slowly" (co-written with Lady Antebellum) and the Top 15 hit "Something to Believe In." Or it could refer to the late evenings put in by chief songwriter Will Anderson, burning the midnight oil, writing in his new Nashville base, after moving from the band's hometown of Charlottesville, VA (where they were discovered and signed to Dave Matthews Band's Red Light Management out of college). Anderson composed more than 50 songs for the album with a variety of collaborators, including Ryan Tedder (the first single, "Can't Help"), as well as Grammy winner Chris DeStefano [Kelly Clarkson] and Ashley Gorley [Carrie Underwood, Keith Urban] on the title track. "Even though there's plenty of pressure to break through on your third album, the actual recording process was much less stressful," says Will about the band's sessions at Ocean Way in Nashville with producer Oren Yoel, a young contemporary who has worked with hip-hop phenom Asher Roth as well as Miley Cyrus, among others. "All of us were on the same wavelength. We all kind of knew exactly what we wanted without having to say it out loud. There was a weird sense of peace that we knew where we were going and where we needed to be." From the pop fervor of "Can't Help" and the powerful simplicity of "Hurricane," composed on acoustic guitar by Will after a long frustrating day, to the '80s Phil Collins-meets-U2 flair of "Waiting for that Call" and the slow Peter Gabriel/John Mayer jam of "The Other Side," Parachute prove adept at combining guitarist Nate McFarland's Edge-influenced arena-rock guitar licks with Will's melodic sense of what will resonate with their passionate fan base. It's no surprise for anyone who has followed the band's history. Will has been playing with drummer Johnny Stubblefield, bassist Alex Hargrave and saxophone/keyboardist Kit French since they were high school classmates in Charlottesville almost 10 years ago. Anderson met Nate while attending University of Virginia together, and the guitarist joined the band six years ago. "We're just now getting to know one another as musicians as well as we know each other as people," says Will. "We wanted to capture a sound in the studio that reflected us as a band. And we all know which parts each of us had to play to get that sound." The band's stylistic palette can run the range from old-school legends like Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Paul Simon and Bruce Springsteen to newer acts like U2, Coldplay, Weezer, Ben Folds, Maroon 5 and John Mayer. With producer Yoel, the band has even begun to stretch the boundaries, with Will's spoken word vocals adding almost a hip-hop flavor to a new song called "Didn't See It Coming," about an actress friend of theirs in Hollywood excited to land a gig, only to discover it was an X-rated feature. "That's probably the catchiest song I've ever written," he says. "I just laid down this spoken-word track, thinking we'd replace it later, but everyone loved it so much, we kept it on." Anderson is most proud of "Hurricane," a song he wrote before going to sleep by strumming an acoustic guitar. "It's like the feeling you get when you think you're never going to be able to write another song," explains Will. "Once I started, it all came spilling out." Anderson credits guitarist Nate with creating parts that were "just perfect" for each song. "He really nailed it, with a unique spin to every song that made them epic, but at the same time, within a pop framework. That's something we've always tried to do, melding his rock guitar to my sensibilities, making it work both for the arena and within the melodic sense of strong hooks. I think we really nailed it this time." Having played more than 400 shows over the last few years, touring around the country with everyone from NeedtoBreathe to Andy Grammer, Parachute's live show continues to grow and impress. They've also played before several million at a New Year's Eve celebration in Times Square, as well as appearing on NBC's The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, ABC's Good Morning America and Jimmy Kimmel Live and CBS' The Early Show. The band's songs have been featured on MTV's The City along with CW's One Tree Hill, Vampire Diaries and 90210. "It's so nice to have three albums' worth of material to choose from in concert," says Will, while the band has always played an eclectic variety of covers, from Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Loving" to vintage tracks from Elton John, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Wonder, the Commodores and Motown. "We're just now hitting our stride as a live band. We're better musicians who have come to trust one another. We all have our pocket and fill it. But we still have a long way to go." Overnight has a little something for everyone. Longtime fans will recognize their favorite band, with a fresh sound bound to intrigue newcomers. "The last album was like taking a brand-new car straight off the lot," says Will. "This album is just as fun to drive, but it's like a vintage Mustang, a little more muscle and grittier, built to last." On their third Mercury Records album, Parachute is firmly in the driver's seat.
Reverend Horton Heat & The Adicts
Friday 08/14
Reverend Horton Heat & The Adicts @ The Howard Theatre
$25 / $30
Reverend Horton Heat Loaded guns, space heaters, and big skies. Welcome to the lethal littered landscape of Jim Heath’s imagination. True to his high evangelical calling, Jim is a Revelator, both revealing & reinterpreting the country-blues-rock roots of American music. He’s a time-travelling space-cowboy on a endless interstellar musical tour, and we are all the richer & “psychobillier” for getting to tag along. Seeing REVEREND HORTON HEAT live is a transformative experience. Flames come off the guitars. Heat singes your skin. There’s nothing like the primal tribal rock & roll transfiguration of a Reverend Horton Heat show. Jim becomes a slicked-back 1950′s rock & roll shaman channeling Screamin’ Jay Hawkins through Buddy Holly, while Jimbo incinerates the StandUp Bass. And then there are the “Heatettes”. Those foxy rockabilly chicks dressed in poodle-skirts and cowboy boots slamming the night away. It’s like being magically transported into a Teen Exploitation picture from the 1950′s that’s currently taking place in the future. Listening to the REVEREND HORTON HEAT is tantamount to injecting pure musical nitrous into the hot-rod engine of your heart. The Reverend’s commandants are simple. And no band on this, or any other, planet rocks harder, drives faster, or lives truer than the Reverend Horton Heat. These “itinerant preachers” actually practice what they preach. They live their lives by the Gospel of Rock & Roll. From the High-Octane Spaghetti-Western Wall of Sound in “Big Sky” — to the dark driving frenetic paranoia of “400 Bucks” – to the brain-melting Western Psychedelic Garage purity of “Psychobilly Freakout” — The Rev’s music is the perfect soundtrack to the Drive-In Movie of your life. Jim Heath & Jimbo Wallace have chewed up more road than the Google Maps drivers. For twentyfive Psychobilly years, they have blazed an indelible, unforgettable, and meteoric trail across the globe with their unique blend of musical virtuosity, legendary showmanship, and mythic imagery. “Okay it’s time for me to put this loaded gun down, jump in my FiveOh Ford, and nurture my pig on the outskirts of Houston. I’ll be bringing my love whip. See y’all later.” - Carty Talkington, Writer/Director Rev your engines and catch the sermon on the road as it’s preached by everybody’s favorite Reverend. Don’t forget to keep an eye out for the 11th studio album from REVEREND HORTON HEAT, boldly titled Rev, due out January 21st. The Adicts The Adicts began life as the Afterbirth & The Pinz, in their hometown of Ipswich back in late 1975. They scored many Indie Chart hits in the Eighties, and are unbelievably still together, and still making great music, with the same line-up - Keith 'Monkey' Warren, vocals; Mel Ellis, bass; Pete Dee Davison, guitar; and Michael 'Kid Dee' Davison, drums - to this day. Newer members are John Scruff Ellis (Mel's brother) guitar & Dan Gratziani on violin. "I think we all started for different reasons," recalls Monkey, of their distant origins. "Pete and Kid moved to Ipswich from Sunderland were already playing on their own, using pillows for drums in the front room. Mel had just failed the audition for Nick Kershaw's band (too tall apparently) and I was a punk without a cause. Exactly what year that was may vary depending on who you talk to. Some say '75, some say '76. I think I have a flyer from March '76, but before that we had played our first show in a scout hut in Aldburgh, Suffolk - not exactly top of the list for all time top punk venues! We strung a rope across the room to keep the 'crowd' back and had a motor bike for a lighting rig. As far as our musical education goes, I think Pete took music at school, and Kid just liked to hit things. I don't know where Mel got his 'talent' from but it seems to run in the family. I still can't play anything." They soon changed their name to The Adicts and became known for their distinctive Clockwork Orange 'Droog' image, which, along with their urgent, uptempo music and light-hearted lyrics, helped set them very much apart from the rest of the genre. "We became The Adicts because The Pinz was such a shit name," deadpans Kid. "At the early gigs we just used to wear punk clothes, but never anything bought, like those posers who went down to Kings Road. After a while though, black came in and it all became boring, so we started to dress in white to be different, and 'Clockwork Orange' had been a major influence on us, though not for the violence, more the teenage angst..."